Independent Thought Alarm

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sarahj-art:

Happy Easter!!!

sarahj-art:

Happy Easter!!!

ceedawkes:

if you can learn to pronounce:

  • arnold schwarzenegger
  • benedict cumberbatch
  • ralph fiennes
  • jake gyllenhaal
  • etc. etc. etc.

you can learn to pronounce:

  • quvenzhané wallis

apatheticghost:

what i learned from school

  1. im a fucking piece of shit
  2. everybody else is also a fucking piece of shit
  3. mitochondria is the powerhouse of the cell
lyssalovescookies:

flailmorpho:

wastelandbabe:

lowbutt:

MY SCIENCE TEACHER CAUGHT THE TABLE ON FIRE AND HES JUST STARING AT IT

I LOVE SCIENCE TEACHERS

I’M SORRY BUT HOW BADLY DID HE FUCK UP READING HIS CALIPER?


#my environmental science teacher was demonstrating how pumice can float#so she just went around the room dropping them into people’s water bottles#but one of them didn’t float#so then she lit a match and dropped it into the bottle#and it blew up#that’s how we found out that the kid was drinking alcohol at school x

lyssalovescookies:

flailmorpho:

wastelandbabe:

lowbutt:

MY SCIENCE TEACHER CAUGHT THE TABLE ON FIRE AND HES JUST STARING AT IT

I LOVE SCIENCE TEACHERS

I’M SORRY BUT HOW BADLY DID HE FUCK UP READING HIS CALIPER?

mresundance:

reckonedrightly:

indypendenthistory:

On Sep 13, 1944, a princess from India lay dead at Dachau concentration camp. She had been tortured by the Nazis, then shot in the head. Her name was Noor Inayat Khan. The Germans knew her only as Nora Baker, a British spy who had gone into occupied France using the code name Madeline. She carried her transmitter from safe house to safe house with the Gestapo trailing her, providing communications for her Resistance unit.

Oh my God, yes. Let’s talk about Noor Inayat Khan.
Wireless operators in France had a life expectancy of six weeks. Noor was actively transmitting for over three times as long.
While she was in France, every other wireless operator in her network was slowly picked off until she was the last radio link between London and Paris. It was “the most dangerous and important post in France”.  
She was offered a way back to Britain and refused.
In fact, in her transmissions to London, she once said that she was having the time of her life, and thanked them for giving her the opportunity to do this.
She was captured by the Gestapo, but never gave up: she made three attempt escapes. One involved asking to take a bath, insisting on being allowed to close the door to preserve her modesty, and then clambering onto the roof of the Gestapo HQ in Paris.
Her last word before being shot was, “Liberté!”

The term BAMF was coined for such persons. 

mresundance:

reckonedrightly:

indypendenthistory:

On Sep 13, 1944, a princess from India lay dead at Dachau concentration camp. She had been tortured by the Nazis, then shot in the head. Her name was Noor Inayat Khan. The Germans knew her only as Nora Baker, a British spy who had gone into occupied France using the code name Madeline. She carried her transmitter from safe house to safe house with the Gestapo trailing her, providing communications for her Resistance unit.

Oh my God, yes. Let’s talk about Noor Inayat Khan.

  • Wireless operators in France had a life expectancy of six weeks. Noor was actively transmitting for over three times as long.
  • While she was in France, every other wireless operator in her network was slowly picked off until she was the last radio link between London and Paris. It was “the most dangerous and important post in France”.  
  • She was offered a way back to Britain and refused.
  • In fact, in her transmissions to London, she once said that she was having the time of her life, and thanked them for giving her the opportunity to do this.
  • She was captured by the Gestapo, but never gave up: she made three attempt escapes. One involved asking to take a bath, insisting on being allowed to close the door to preserve her modesty, and then clambering onto the roof of the Gestapo HQ in Paris.
  • Her last word before being shot was, “Liberté!”

The term BAMF was coined for such persons. 


As for any potential love scenes with the Black Widow herself — an arc that played out in the comics — Stan wouldn’t mind those, either. “Hey, listen, I could talk about the Black Widow all you want!” he laughed. “That’s an amazing story line. I would love for that to happen.” The actor got a little tongue-tied, even, musing on the possibility of seducing Scarlett Johansson onscreen: “That is … something … one should … have a chance at doing. Yes.”

As for any potential love scenes with the Black Widow herself — an arc that played out in the comics — Stan wouldn’t mind those, either.Hey, listen, I could talk about the Black Widow all you want!” he laughed. “That’s an amazing story line. I would love for that to happen.” The actor got a little tongue-tied, even, musing on the possibility of seducing Scarlett Johansson onscreen: “That is … something … one should … have a chance at doing. Yes.”

(Source: fysebastianstan)

lintott:

no one ever likes me as much as i like them 

(Source: bloodyoathmate)

(Source: madtolive23)

My third grade teacher called my mother and said, ‘Ms. Cox, your son is going to end up in New Orleans in a dress if we don’t get him into therapy.’ And wouldn’t you know, just last week I spoke at Tulane University, and I wore a LOVELY green and black dress.

-

Laverne Cox, speaking at the University of Kentucky (via so-nyeo-shi-daze)

Anyone who doesn’t think that Laverne Cox is one of the most flawless women on the planet is simply wrong <3

(via thefingerfuckingfemalefury)

(Source: diana-de-vill)

(Source: patarnon)

littlehorrorshop:

Happy Birthday Harold Lloyd! » Born April 20, 1893

In the collective mindset of the masses, it’s a given assumption that F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Jay Gatsby is the dominant, all-encompassing definitive characterization of America’s Roaring Twenties.

But a more appropriate personification of the decade is Harold Lloyd, whose life, films, and most of all ‘Glass’ character reflected the social dynamics and attitudes of that transformative era. Whilst in retrospect we maybe see the jaded disillusionment of ourselves and our times in Gatsby, those living through the 1920s saw themselves in go-getter Harold Lloyd’s energetic screen presence. His endearing optimism and distinctive character is unmistakable. Always pushing the possibilities, but never pushing them into the absurd, he grounded himself firmly in the social imaginations and values that formed modern America.

Harold Lloyd captured the essence of ambition and social possibility that shaped the 20s more than any other movie idol. And among the comedy giants, there were none bigger. He was the most real, the most human. And he was handsome. He was resourceful, even when travelling at high speed through the urban phantasmagoria of the booming city. Obsessed with climbing the social ladder, making a buck, and getting the girl, he achieved all three through the genius of his inventive spirit, endless energy, and intuition; such was also the nature of Lloyd’s filmmaking. So many film ‘firsts’ were Harold’s.

Even people who don’t know Lloyd’s name will probably recognize the ubiquitous image of the young man in horn-rimmed glasses and boater hat, scaling the side of a building and dangling from the hands of its clock. Like never before, suddenly in the 20s the impossible was possible, and Harold Lloyd did the impossible, right before the audience’s eyes. He fulfilled the dream, and like scaling a building, reached the highest heights. But as every decade must end, so did the 20s, and no other decade ended quite as hard. Inevitably thus, the sparkle in Lloyd’s eye faded out.

One simply can’t deny or ignore Harold Lloyd’s universally timeless appeal. Yes, he embodied the collective dreams of social self-betterment that so tapped into the 20s movie-going public, but his comedy also stands up today as uniquely relatable and exciting. That smile could tap into the American Dream of any era. Yet he is solidified in history, tied to his time and his place. Harold Lloyd is eternally youthful; eternally 20s.

rifa:

for-redheads:

Professor X and Magneto

THEY ARE MAKING FUN OF EACH OTHER TOGETHER IT HURTS ME

(Source: stewardish)

(Source: pdlcomics)